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Mothers Who Received Inadequate Prenatal Care

This indicator shows the percentage of mothers who received less than adequate prenatal care.

Mothers Who Received Inadequate Prenatal Care

14.0
12.0
Comparison: NE State Value 

12.0

percent
Measurement Period: 2012

County: Douglas

Data Source: Douglas County Health Department, Vital Statistics data evaluated using Kessner method through 2004, Kotelchuck Index thereafter. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Vital Statistics
Categories: Health / Maternal, Fetal & Infant Health, Health / Family Planning
Technical Note: The regional value is compared to the Nebraska State value for the latest year the Nebraska State value is available, 2011. Currently there are no U.S. values available for comparison.
Note: the comparison measurement period (2011) does not match the measurement period of the value.
Maintained By: Live Well Omaha and the Douglas County Health Department
Last Updated: October 2013

Why is this important?

Women should begin prenatal care by the end of their first trimester of pregnancy, and according to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, should have at least 13 prenatal visits for a full-term pregnancy. Early prenatal care allows women and their health care providers to identify and, when possible, treat or correct health problems and health-compromising behaviors that can be particularly damaging during the initial stages of fetal development. Increasing the number of women who receive prenatal care, and who do so early in their pregnancies, can improve birth outcomes and lower health care costs by reducing the likelihood of complications during pregnancy and childbirth.

Based on the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization (APNCU) Index, mothers who receive less than adequate prenatal care include women who received intermediate, inadequate, or no prenatal care.

Mothers Who Received Inadequate Prenatal Care : Time Series

2006: 13.6 2007: 13.9 2008: 14.4 2009: 12.7 2010: 13.9 2011: 12.3 2012: 12.0

percent

Mothers Who Received Inadequate Prenatal Care

Comparison: Prior Value 

12.0

percent
Measurement Period: 2012

County: Douglas

Data Source: Douglas County Health Department, Vital Statistics data evaluated using Kessner method through 2004, Kotelchuck Index thereafter. Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services, Vital Statistics
Categories: Health / Maternal, Fetal & Infant Health, Health / Family Planning
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were not taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Live Well Omaha and the Douglas County Health Department
Last Updated: October 2013

Why is this important?

Women should begin prenatal care by the end of their first trimester of pregnancy, and according to the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, should have at least 13 prenatal visits for a full-term pregnancy. Early prenatal care allows women and their health care providers to identify and, when possible, treat or correct health problems and health-compromising behaviors that can be particularly damaging during the initial stages of fetal development. Increasing the number of women who receive prenatal care, and who do so early in their pregnancies, can improve birth outcomes and lower health care costs by reducing the likelihood of complications during pregnancy and childbirth.

Based on the Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization (APNCU) Index, mothers who receive less than adequate prenatal care include women who received intermediate, inadequate, or no prenatal care.

Mothers Who Received Inadequate Prenatal Care : Time Series

2006: 13.6 2007: 13.9 2008: 14.4 2009: 12.7 2010: 13.9 2011: 12.3 2012: 12.0

percent