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Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate

This indicator shows the age-adjusted incidence rate for lung and bronchus cancers in cases per 100,000 population.

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate

72.0
83.0
Comparison: U.S. Counties 

73.5

cases/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2006-2010

County: Douglas

Categories: Health / Cancer, Health / Respiratory Diseases
Technical Note: The distribution is based on data from 2,607 U.S. counties and county equivalents.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: July 2013
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Why is this important?

More people die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. In 2002, lung cancer accounted for more deaths than breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer combined. Lung cancer is the second most common cancer for all males in the U.S., as well as for white and American Indian/Alaska Native females, and is the third most common cancer among black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic females. In the United States in 2009, it is estimated that there were 219,440 new cases and 159,390 deaths from lung cancer.

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate : Time Series

2003-2007: 80.0 2004-2008: 77.0 2005-2009: 74.7 2006-2010: 73.5

cases/100,000 population

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate by Gender

Female: 68.7 Male: 79.8 Overall: 73.5

cases/100,000 population

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 85.4 Hispanic: 45.0 White: 72.7 Overall: 73.5

cases/100,000 population

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate

Comparison: Prior Value 

73.5

cases/100,000 population
Measurement Period: 2006-2010

County: Douglas

Categories: Health / Cancer, Health / Respiratory Diseases
Technical Note: The trend is a comparison between the most recent and previous measurement periods. Confidence intervals were taken into account in determining the direction of the trend.
Maintained By: Healthy Communities Institute
Last Updated: July 2013

Why is this important?

More people die from lung cancer than any other type of cancer. In 2002, lung cancer accounted for more deaths than breast cancer, prostate cancer, and colon cancer combined. Lung cancer is the second most common cancer for all males in the U.S., as well as for white and American Indian/Alaska Native females, and is the third most common cancer among black, Asian/Pacific Islander, and Hispanic females. In the United States in 2009, it is estimated that there were 219,440 new cases and 159,390 deaths from lung cancer.

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate : Time Series

2003-2007: 80.0 2004-2008: 77.0 2005-2009: 74.7 2006-2010: 73.5

cases/100,000 population

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate by Gender

Female: 68.7 Male: 79.8 Overall: 73.5

cases/100,000 population

Lung and Bronchus Cancer Incidence Rate by Race/Ethnicity

Black: 85.4 Hispanic: 45.0 White: 72.7 Overall: 73.5

cases/100,000 population